8.9.08

Precis: Apples to Apples, Dust to Dust

In a seemingly perfect world, what creates chaos? Indeed it is the lack of true perfection. If Adam had been “perfect”, he would have perfect sight, perfect wisdom; he would have been created not in God’s image, but as a god himself. In Genesis, we see the condition placed upon Adam by God and the implications of violating that condition: "You are free to eat from any tree in the garden; but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat of it you will surely die" (Genesis 2: 16 – 18). Yet when the opportunity presents itself, there is no hesitation to acquire the knowledge that separates Adam from his maker. In this act, the result is well known, and the value of wisdom is shown to be greater than that of a seemingly perfect world.

2 comments:

chdonald said...

"You are free to eat from any tree in the garden; but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat of it you will surely die" (Genesis 2: 16 – 18).

The interesting aspect to this quote is that fact that it is a bold-faced lie; God lied to Adam out of greed of knowledge. God allows this temptation to exist in his earthly paradise, for unknown reasons. The circumstances within this dilemma seem to imply an unconditional trust with God's creations that is borderline pride. God's fallibility seems to become human. Yet it is important to note that even when Adam becomes knowledgeable of good and evil, he remains inadequate in comparison to the awesome power of his Creator.

P.S. Apples to Apples is a great game.

-Chris D.

Cardinal said...

Your attention to the inadequacy suggested by the image is terrific here. Let's bear this in mind as we think about Genesis in relation to Plato's cave.

EM