24.9.08

word: DOUBLE--Sarah Knoth

DOUBLE

 

OED’s definition:

 b. A counterpart; an image, or exact copy (of a thing or person).    c. spec. The apparition of a living person; a wraith, fetch.

 

The word double in Lacan’s Ecrits is the word that helps the reader wrap his head Lacan’s theory and around the ideas of the Gestalt principle, the id, the ego, and the mirror. In his essay, Lacan tries to explain to his reader the process of a person’s understanding of his own existence. What’s interesting about the OED’s definition is that it’s first attempt to explain the double is to compare it to the word counterpart. In this case, our counterpart is our mirror-image. Lacan goes on to explain to the reader the significance of identification. This identification can be found through the mirror stage---seeing one’s double---and then advancing to the revelation of the “relation between the organism and its reality (4). I found it interesting that the human infant can become conscious of his existence through the image of his double in a mirror; therefore, we have a greater understanding and a greater “autonomy than animal knowledge” (3). With this comparison, it is essential to the reader that he understands the significance of a reflection. My dog still barks at herself when she sees her double in the reflection of our glass sliding door; I, on the other hand, don’t get scared with I see my double because I have an understanding of my reality and my existence, or as much as I can thus far.

 

ttp://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2055/cgi/entry/50068959?query_type=word&queryword=double&first=1&max_to_show=10&sort_type=alpha&result_place=1&search_id=GuOY-xXzhUT-18865&hilite=50068959


DOUBLE

 

OED’s definition:

 b. A counterpart; an image, or exact copy (of a thing or person).    c. spec. The apparition of a living person; a wraith, fetch.

 

The word double in Lacan’s Ecrits is the word that helps the reader wrap his head Lacan’s theory and around the ideas of the Gestalt principle, the id, the ego, and the mirror. In his essay, Lacan tries to explain to his reader the process of a person’s understanding of his own existence. What’s interesting about the OED’s definition is that it’s first attempt to explain the double is to compare it to the word counterpart. In this case, our counterpart is our mirror-image. Lacan goes on to explain to the reader the significance of identification. This identification can be found through the mirror stage---seeing one’s double---and then advancing to the revelation of the “relation between the organism and its reality (4). I found it interesting that the human infant can become conscious of his existence through the image of his double in a mirror; therefore, we have a greater understanding and a greater “autonomy than animal knowledge” (3). With this comparison, it is essential to the reader that he understands the significance of a reflection. My dog still barks at herself when she sees her double in the reflection of our glass sliding door; I, on the other hand, don’t get scared with I see my double because I have an understanding of my reality and my existence, or as much as I can thus far.

 http://bert.lib.indiana.edu:2055/cgi/entry/50068959?query_type=word&queryword=double&first=1&max_to_show=10&sort_type=alpha&result_place=1&search_id=GuOY-xXzhUT-18865&hilite=50068959



1 comment:

Sarah said...

Sorry about the double post! I write my entries in a word document then copy/paste. Sorry!